kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Airship)
8. A song about drugs or alcohol

Today you get two, because the first song I thought of presents alcohol in a negative (though funny) light, and I wanted a happier one as well. The fact that these are both Irish songs is, well, insert your own joke here, but it's also because for several years of my life I listened almost exclusively to Irish folk and traditional music.


Altan, "Donal Agus Morag"

This song is the happy one. It's about the wedding of Donal and Morag; the first verse is about all the people who were there, the next two detail the food, and the last verse mentions all the alcohol. There's an Irish transcription and English translation here.





Christy Moore, "Delirium Tremens"

This one's about alcohol's potential bad effects. It's also hilarious, though much of the humor comes from highly specific references to Irish politics and history. Wikipedia may be your friend here. I can tell you that Harpic is not an alcohol, but a brand of toilet bowl cleaner.

ETA: The Guinness ad Moore refers to may be this one here. It is magnificently awful.




All the prompts )
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Default)
7. A song to drive to

What better than a song about a journey? Or about several journeys, I think, only one of them physical.

This is a live version, because, annoyingly, the album version is blocked on YouTube for copyright reasons.

Paul Simon with Vincent Guinea* and John Selowawane*, "Graceland"

(*Name spellings are my best guess based on how Simon pronounced them)





All the prompts )
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Default)
6. A song that makes you want to dance

I am not, on the whole, a dancing person. "But it's just moving to the music," people say, but that's the problem. What if the way I move to the music looks stupid? I do not want to have to show spontaneous grace and creativity when other people might be watching me. (Plus, on my very few visits to clubs where people dance, the music was always too loud, the lights too weird, the crowd too crowded.)

However, back when my knees were younger, I did enjoy ceili dancing. The great thing about ceili dancing is that it's not spontaneous. There are steps! You don't have to be creative. You don't, at least at the ceilis I went to, have to be particularly graceful, either.

So here's some Irish traditional music, the sort of thing you might hear at a ceili. And if Martin Hayes, one of the finest fiddlers of his generation, plays at your ceili, you're privileged indeed.


Martin Hayes, "The Morning Star/The Caoilte Mountains"




Your toes were tapping, weren't they?


All the prompts )
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Airship)
5. A song that needs to be played LOUD.

Apparently this song was a huge hit in 2006, but I managed not to encounter it until I watched Klia's amazing Life on Mars fanvid. (I'd love to link to the vid, but there doesn't seem to be a streaming version up anymore. You can go to her LJ, which will direct you to her website, and there you can request a password to a downloadable version.)

Gnarls Barkley, "Crazy"




All the prompts )
kindkit: The Fifth Doctor looks at Turlough from a distance. (Doctor Who: Five and Turlough distant)
4. A song that reminds you of someone you'd rather forget about

Well, this song reminds me of a moment I'd rather forget about and a person I remember with a good deal of regret.

REM, "Country Feedback"





All the prompts )
kindkit: Two cups of green tea. (Fandomless: Green tea)
Something I've cooked recently: It's been a hard week for me personally, not to mention the general state of the world, so I've been in the mood for comfort food. Midweek I had hamburgers, and yesterday I cooked a potato gattó, a dish from Naples that originated while the French ruled there (the name is borrowed from the French gâteau). It's very much like an Italian version of a cheese-and-potato pie.

How I made it )

I also made some chicken stock yesterday, via the cheat I always use when I don't have a lot of bones--I simmered the bones in a quart of decent commercial chicken broth plus enough water to cover. I also added a beef bone I had in the freezer, and it contributed a much more complex flavor.

This morning, to finally do something with the chocolate in my pantry that needed using before the summer heat fully sets in, I made some thick chocolate ganache--the kind you use for truffles--and stuck it in the freezer to await inspiration and/or cravings.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: I'm going to make a meatloaf today, continuing the comfort-food theme. I've got roughly equal parts beef and pork, and I'll give it Mediterranean flavors with some smoked paprika, some chopped olives, and some oven-candied tomatoes as well as anything else I think of.

Like the gattó, this is rather wintry cooking even though it's too warm here for me to be enthusiastic about using the oven. But there will be lovely leftovers, plus it lets me use up a lot of meat from the freezer.

Also today I intend to roast the apricots I bought on sale a few days ago. The oven again, but at least the prep will be very simple--just a buttered pan and some honey drizzled over the fruit, I think.


Something I vaguely intend to cook someday: all the Mediterranean-y summery things. I need to cut down on spending, so I expect there'll be a lot of zucchini and other cheap plentiful veg, and beans and pasta.
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Airship)
3. A song that reminds you of summer

This is cheating a little, since it has the word "Summer" in the title, but it's one of the few songs I really do viscerally associate with that season (even though it's about the end of summer).

I wanted to post the Don Henley version,* since it has a stronger summery feeling for me, but I couldn't find anything but a live version on YouTube. Anyway, I do very much like this punk-pop cover.

The Ataris, "The Boys of Summer"





*Shut up, everybody is allowed to like one song by the Eagles or Don Henley, and this is mine.


List of prompts under the cut )
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Default)
2. A song you like with a number in the title.

"Plus Ones," by Okkervil River. I picked this one because it's not only a cool song, it's a sort of meta-answer, referencing as it does a whole lot of other songs with numbers in their titles.





List of prompts under the cut )
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Airship)
For lack of anything very thoughtful that I want to post about, here's my first contribution to that music meme that's been going around.


1.A song you like with a colour in the title

The Clash, "(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais"




All the prompts under the cut )
kindkit: Man sitting on top of a huge tower of books, reading. (Fandomless--book tower)
I eventually found my keys, so I'm very very happily back home. I may post the full and exciting saga tomorrow, but right now I'm too tired.
kindkit: Two cups of green tea. (Fandomless: Green tea)
Something I've cooked recently: I finally got around to making the potato salad with anchovies and olives that I kept mentioning. It's delicious and as simple as can be: boil some waxy potatoes until tender, dress them with anchovy vinaigrette, add a few olives (pitted and chopped if you like, or whole) and maybe some parsley. I made the vinaigrette with one 2-ounce tin of anchovies (drained), a medium-sized minced shallot, a clove of minced garlic, a generous teaspoon of Dijon mustard, a substantial amount of olive oil (maybe 3/4 cup?), and red wine vinegar until it tasted right. There was of course quite a lot of vinaigrette left over, which I used during the week on various salads. It turns out that arugula with anchovy vinaigrette is fantastic. Keep the vinaigrette refrigerated and use it up within a week, though, because oil + raw garlic + storage can equal botulism.

Also last week I finished the last steps for the pickled cherries. The process is that you soak the cherries overnight in vinegar, then add spices and sugar to the vinegar and boil it and then soak the cherries in it at room temperature for three days, then boil the liquid yet again and pack it and the cherries into sterilized jars and refrigerate for at least a month. The leftover vinegar solution tasted really good, so I'm optimistic. If they taste good in a month I'll post the recipe.

I've started using the brandied cherries that I made a week or so ago. I can report that they are delicious with chocolate ice cream. You can also make a tasty spritzer by putting a few cherries and a good glug of the brandy into the bottom of a tall glass and topping it off with a 12 oz can of cherry-flavored unsweetened sparkling water. Lime flavored would probably be good too. ETA: No, definitely use cherry flavored.

Today I made a farro salad with roasted vegetables and arugula. I roasted a bag of mini-peppers, cored and quartered lengthwise, and a thickly sliced large onion in some olive oil at 400 F until everything was tender and sweet and just slightly charred at the edges. While the vegetables roasted and cooled I cooked about a cup and a half of farro in lots of boiling water--the same way you'd cook pasta--and drained it when it was tender but chewy. I added two minced cloves of garlic and the juice of a lemon to the hot farro, then mixed in the veg and let it cool down to room temperature. At that point I added a nice bunch of roughly chopped arugula and a few finely chopped mint leaves along with just a splash of oil, and then mixed in a couple of ounces of crumbled feta. The result is both pretty and delicious, though if you like lemon as much as I do you might want to use two, and don't forget to add the zest as well. Here, have a picture. )


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: I've got chickpeas in the slow cooker, some to become hummus and some to be frozen for future use as who knows what? And later today I'm going to cook Amalfi-style zucchini/courgettes based on Marcella Hazan's recipe. It's basically fried zucchini dressed with garlic, wine vinegar, and mint. Hazan's recipe calls for the zucchini slices to almost deep-fry in a lot of oil, but I'm going to saute them in olive oil instead, because I have never had a good experience deep-frying at home and anyway I feel, with apologies to the doyenne of Italian cooking for Anglophone audiences, that they'll taste better that way.

I also have a hami melon I bought on sale. Depending on how it tastes I may eat it plain or dress it up a bit with lime juice, honey, and yet more mint. Actually the dressed-up option is extremely tempting regardless, because I recently bought some Turkish honey from Trader Joe's and it is so good that I went back and bought a second bottle just in case TJ's suddenly stops carrying it, as is their wont with many of my favorite products.


Something I vaguely plan to cook someday: I have no immediate plans to bake, because my freezer is still crammed with rhubarb coffee cake, orange and almond polenta cake, and half a recipe of uncooked dough for digestive biscuits. And yet I am longing to bake J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's Best Chocolate Chip Cookies, and now-ish is the time to do it so I can use up my chocolate before the weather gets too hot. Otherwise I seem to have switched into summer eating mode. I've got little multicolored tomatoes that aren't bad for out of season, and some ricotta to eat them with, and various salady things, and tons of pasta because whenever I see decent pasta on sale I buy multiple packages. I still have a piece of Spanish-style chorizo to use in something, and some calf's liver in the freezer, and chicken bones that should go into stock, and etc. etc. I want to try as much as possible to just do vegetables + pantry and freezer supplies for a while.

I would quite like to eat some Indian food, but cooking it is so labor-intensive that I don't know if a mere craving is sufficient motivation. Hopefully one of these days I'll have a weekend where I want to cook elaborate things, as opposed to one where I want to cook easy things and then watch cooking shows on Netflix and YouTube.
kindkit: A late-Victorian futuristic zeppelin. (Default)
It's a little embarrassing when you hear a great song on the radio, and you google the lyrics as soon as you get home so you can find out what it was, and it turns out to have been released thirty years ago. And apparently was a big hit at the time.

Ah, well, it's new to me?



kindkit: Two naked men having sex in the grass (Fandomless: Men in a field)
I just watched American Gods 1x03, and I would like to report that not spoilery for anything plot related )
kindkit: Two cups of green tea. (Fandomless: Green tea)
Something I've cooked recently: The digestive biscuits I baked last Sunday turned out well, despite my having to substitute rolled oats (porridge oats) for the medium oats called for, because medium oats are not to be found in the US or at least not by me. I think the biscuits are a bit too sweet to eat with cheese as F-W suggests, but they're tasty with Nutella on top (what wouldn't be?) and best, in my opinion, eaten plain with a cup of milky spiced chai.

I decided to start a second batch of pickled cherries, because I made the first batch using the last of a bottle of unfiltered cider vinegar, and while the pickling liquid tastes fine it looks rather murky. So I bought more cherries, and since the supermarket only sells them in big bags I had the perfect amount left over to make a clafoutis this morning. I make clafoutis fairly regularly (meaning, once or twice a year) but I think this is the first time I've actually made the traditional version, with cherries. The cherries in a classic clafoutis are not pitted, which suited me fine as I don't have a pitter and am much too lazy to do it by hand. It does make me wonder how the French handle the etiquette of spitting out the cherry pits.

A few days ago I got a sudden, tremendous craving for red meat, and the universe obliged me by letting me find an enormous two-inch-thick rib steak at the supermarket, heavily discounted as it was near its sell-by date. I've often had trouble cooking steak correctly, for some reason, but I seared it in a very hot pan for two minutes per side, then finished it in a moderate oven, and it was perfect. I used some of the leftovers in a steak sandwich the next day, will add the rest of the meat to a salad today with romaine lettuce and blue cheese, and the bone is in my freezer awaiting the next time I make stock. It's probably ridiculous to even mention cooking something as simple as a steak, but I'm really pleased that I managed to get it a lovely pink all the way through, right on the cusp between rare and medium rare, neither raw in the middle nor (to my taste) overdone. It's clearly the thickness of the steak that makes the difference; it's hard to find thick steaks without paying top dollar, but I'll keep an eye out for them from now on.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: I don't have any concrete plans. I've got a bag of those nice miniature bell peppers and I kind of want to stuff them, but I'm still mulling over the stuffing. I want to use the last of a hunk of Spanish-style chorizo I bought a while back, but I'm undecided between rice and bread crumbs for the starchy bit. I should also--separately--make the potato salad with anchovies and olives that I didn't make last weekend, to use the potatoes before they go bad. (Though actually, uncooked mini peppers stuffed with that potato salad sound like they might be rather good . . . I do intend to make normal, cooked stuffed peppers this time, but it's an idea for the future.)


Something I'm vaguely thinking about cooking someday: Everything, as usual. It occurred to me today that the pickled cherries might be fantastic with duck, but that's probably an autumn dish. I am actually really longing for seasonal things; next week I should try to get myself to the farmers' market and see what's available and whether I can afford any of it.


One final and somewhat food-related note: [personal profile] st_aurafina told me that Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, he of the digestive biscuits, has cooking shows, and now I've been binge-watching Escape to River Cottage and fantasizing about an idyllic little place in the country with a stream and a garden and some pigs. Of course it's the kind of simple life that actually requires a good deal of money, at least at the start, and then a lot of hard labor to maintain. But a boy can dream. The thought of being really alone, of being able to go for a walk and not see anyone, appeals increasingly, especially now that with the internet you can still have access to entertainment, shopping, and human contact when you want it with people you actually like. I've lived all my adult life in one city or another, and there's a lot I love about cities, but I grew up deep in the country and I've been realizing, over the last few years, that it formed me more than I knew at the time.
kindkit: Two cups of green tea. (Fandomless: Green tea)
Cherries are on sale at the supermarket, so I bought a nice bagful today and have made brandied cherries (using this recipe but with the spices from this recipe). The rest of the cherries are soaking overnight in vinegar, to be turned into pickled cherries tomorrow. I did eat a few of them fresh, as well, but mostly I wanted to do things with them.

I feel like a domestic god, although it was all very easy, actually.
kindkit: Two cups of green tea. (Fandomless: Green tea)
Something I've cooked recently: Inspired by the rhubarb challenge at [community profile] weekly_food_challenge, I bought some rhubarb and used it to bake this big crumb coffee cake. For once I mostly followed the recipe, apart from substituting plain yogurt for the sour cream and a few high-altitude adjustments. It is completely delicious, as you might expect from anything with that much butter in it.

It's not a glamorous-looking cake and I'm not a good photographer, but have a pic anyway:

under the cut )

The coffee cake only used half my rhubarb--I bought a lot because I originally planned to make jam with it, but then I discovered that the jam recipe required pectin and I was too lazy to go out and buy some. I didn't want to make another sweet thing, so I decided to use rhubarb as a vegetable. Some thinking about what would be enhanced by rhubarb's sourness quickly led me to curry, specifically a red lentil curry. I couldn't find a recipe that really suited me, so I improvised. I cooked it this morning and ate it for breakfast, because I'm like that.

Here's what I did )

Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: Today I definitely intend to make a batch of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's digestive biscuits--I meant to do this last weekend but didn't get around to it. (The recipe sounds great, but I admit to also being attracted by his name, which is so quintessentially upper-class-English that I keep picturing him as a young Hugh Grant.) And I'll probably make some potato salad with anchovies and olives from Marcella Hazan's recipe. Three different cuisines in one day, why not?


Something I vaguely plan to cook eventually: Not much. I have a lot of salad fixings, and some frozen tamales that I bought on clearance for super-cheap and which are taking up a lot of freezer space. So the plan for the week is tamales and salads. And I shouldn't need to bake again for ages, since I've still got a ton of last week's orange, almond, and polenta cake in the freezer as well as yesterday's coffee cake, and soon there will be biscuits as well. Although I do have some chocolate that needs using up . . .

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